This post comes through the cheapskates at Tokyo Desu, who borrowed our bikes a year ago and have yet to return them.

For most men and women in Japan, kimono and yukata are only worn on specific occasions such as graduations and festivals, but some men and women pick to put on them more typically. If you devote a day in Tokyo, for example, you are probably to see at least one particular person wearing the conventional type of Japanese clothing. But with the lengthy, tight match it is impossible to ride a bicycle, meaning wearers have to either do a painfully slow stroll of tiny methods or, if in a hurry, an ungraceful shuffle. Until now…

kimono-bike

The KOTO-LX 20 is especially developed with a low bottom bar and no crossbar so that conventional women’s clothing does not get caught. Sadly, they’re not low-cost – they cost upwards of 45,800 yen (roughly $ 420). They come in three kimono-complementing colours: light blue, white and purple.

kimono-bike-1

kimono-bike-seat

Now all we need to have are bicycles developed specifically for people like us who want to ride to the shops in their wearable futon.

Tokyo Cheapo